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History and Traditions
The Barristers Society
 
Summary
The Barristers Society was founded in 1904 as a literary society and evolved into an upperclassmen honorary society.  The Barristers were responsible for organizing two annual Law School dances, the Wigge and Robe and the Crease Ball; publishing the annual Raw Review; and making contributions to the Case Clubs and scholarships. 
 
Details by Year: 1954
List of Years

The Barristers Society: 1954
 
The Barristers Society was founded in 1904 at which time it was one of several literary societies in the Law School of the University of Michigan. It is the sole survivor of these societies, and through the years it has evolved into an honorary society, composed of seniors and second semester juniors. The Society sponsors the two annual Law School dances, the Wigge and Robe and the Crease Ball, the proceeds of which go to scholarships and to the Case Clubs.
-- From The Quad, 1954.
Details by Year: 1956
List of Years

The Barristers Society: 1956
 
Humor clothed in dignity - or is it the other way around. One of the oldest established honorary societies, the Barristers probably produce more social revenue per capita than any comparable organization on campus. Two annual spectaculars, Wigge and Robe and Crease Ball, weekly luncheons, nightly quaffing, and a most distinguished membership insure the group's continued prosperity - in spite of disciplinary restrictions.
-- From The Quad, 1956.
Details by Year: 1957
List of Years

The Barristers Society: 1957
 
Composed of 35 upperclassmen who possess various and sundry academic and social talents, in addition to black string ties, the Barristers have been conducting semi-annual law library bell-ringing sessions (in one library or another) since 1904.
In addition to sponsoring a pre-party and a dance each semester, Wigge & Robe in the fall, Crease Ball in the spring, and putting out an annual publication of somewhat questionable merit, The Raw Review, the Barristers make a yearly contribution to the operation of the Case Clubs, and they have established a $250 scholarship which is awarded each fall to a deserving member of the senior class in the Law School.
The Society’s Constitution states that the object “shall be the social and professional advancement of its members and of the law school”. And while this basic objective has changed little over the years, particular traditions have come and gone; the black string ties, for example, did not make their first appearance until 1947.
Each spring, the members select ten men from the junior class to perpetuate the group the following fall, and in the fall those ten elect an additional fifteen.
-- From The Quad, 1957.
Details by Year: 1964
List of Years

The Barristers Society: 1964
 
Composed of 35 upperclassmen who possess various and sundry academic and social talents, in addition to black string ties, the Barristers have been conducting semi-annual law library bell-ringing sessions since 1904. The Barristers sponsor the Crease Ball in the spring and put out an annual publication of somewhat questionable merit called the Raw Review.
The Society's constitution states that the object "shall be the social and professional advancement of its members and of the law school". And while this basic objective has changed little over the years, particular traditions have come and gone; the black string ties, for example, did not make their first appearance until 1947.
Each spring the members select ten men from the junior class to perpetuate the group the following fall, and in the fall those ten elect an additional fifteen.
-- From The Quad, 1964.
Details by Year: 1966
List of Years

The Barristers Society: 1966
 
An honorary which emphasizes diversity and scholarship, and takes itself with whimsical levity, Barristers has been doing good turns since 1904. Sometime in the 1920s the group originated its annual Crease Ball. There is a scholarship awarded each year to a deserving student, and the University enjoys the Barristers’ services as ushers at Centennial Celebrations. Occasionally the Society decides to publish an issue of the Raw Review, always oversubscribed.
The twenty-five members of the Barristers gather bi-weekly, if it can be arranged, in order to further their variegated designs. Each spring ten juniors are initiated and these tap fifteen classmates the following fall.
Once service is paid its due, Barristers unabashedly promotes conviviality, though it always maintains a decorum befitting a body so venerable.
-- From The Quad, 1966.
Details by Year: 1988
List of Years

The Barristers Society: 1988
 
The Barristers is a secret society founded in 1904 and dedicated to bacchanalian pursuit. The secrecy of the organization is fostered in part by time honored tradition and in part by the fact that its members are rarely seen in classes and even more rarely speak when there. In spite of this, to those of the student body whose mouths curl up in disdainful glee at the thought that the Barristers will one day pay a price for their frivolous ways, you must live with the fact that, if past experience holds true, apart from having more fun than the rest of the class, in the end the Barristers will probably make more money.
-- From The Quadrangle, 1988.
Details by Year: 1990
List of Years

The Barristers Society: 1990
 
The Barristers is a secret society founded in 1904 and dedicated to Bacchanalian pursuits. The secrecy of the organization is fostered in part by time honored tradition and in part by the fact that its members are rarely seen in classes and even more rarely speak when there. The group is not, and does not aspire to be, a school recognized group; nor is it put off at not being allowed a pendaflex in Dean Eklund’s parade of outstanding organizations. The fact that you read this summary of our infamous society is proof enough that not even the administration of this university can prevent us from having fun. In spite of this there are those whose mouths curl up in disdainful glee at the thought that the Barristers will one day pay a price for their frivolous ways. However, they must inevitably live with the fact that, if past experience holds true, apart from having more fun than the rest of the class, in the end the Barristers will make just as much money.
-- From The Quadrangle, 1990.
 
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