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Fall 2017 Course Descriptions

As of 12/10/2017 5:40:49 AM

Clinic

980   Advanced Clinical Law

This graded course is intended to give a few students who have excelled in any clinical law course the chance to spend another semester doing casework for that clinic. Students will work under faculty supervision on more complicated cases and will shoulder more of the responsibility for those cases. The course gives students a broader range of lawyering experience at a higher level of sophistication than is possible the first time through. Students are enrolled by invitation only, after having expressed interest to one of the clinical faculty or administrators. Faculty and invited students determine the number of credits to be awarded.

910   Child Advocacy Clinic

The Child Advocacy Law Clinic provides students with an in-depth, interdisciplinary experience in problems of child abuse and neglect and of children in foster care. The clinic represents parents in one Michigan county, children in another, and the Michigan Child Protection Agency in six counties all in specific child maltreatment and termination of parental rights cases. With close support and supervision of an interdisciplinary faculty, the law student addresses the complex legal, social, emotional, ethical, and public policy questions of when and how the state ought to intervene in family life on behalf of children. Law students will work with practicing professionals, faculty, and students from social work, psychology, pediatrics, and psychiatry. The Child Advocacy Law Clinic seeks to introduce students to their new lawyer identity, the substantive and skill demands of this new role, and the institutional framework within which lawyers operate. The Clinic especially focuses on the relationship between the lawyer and other professionals facing the same social problem. Building on the field experience of actual case handling as a basis for analysis, it seeks to make students more self-critical and reflective about various lawyering functions they must undertake. Students are asked to integrate legal theory with real human crises in the cases they handle. Students will develop habits of thought and standards of performance and learn how to learn from raw experience for their future professional growth. Students must enroll for the 4-credit clinic and the 3-credit seminar, taken concurrently. The Child Advocacy Law Clinic meets the New York Pro-Bono requirement. CALC is a 7 credit course, all credits are graded. The Clinic seminar fulfills the Law School's professional responsibility requirement for graduation, but does not fulfill the New York State Bar ethics requirement.

911   Child Advocacy Clinic Seminar

The Child Advocacy Law Clinic provides students with an in-depth, interdisciplinary experience in problems of child abuse and neglect and of children in foster care. The clinic represents parents in one Michigan county, children in another, and the Michigan Child Protection Agency in six counties all in specific child maltreatment and termination of parental rights cases. With close support and supervision of an interdisciplinary faculty, the law student addresses the complex legal, social, emotional, ethical, and public policy questions of when and how the state ought to intervene in family life on behalf of children. Law students will work with practicing professionals, faculty, and students from social work, psychology, pediatrics, and psychiatry. The Child Advocacy Law Clinic seeks to introduce students to their new lawyer identity, the substantive and skill demands of this new role, and the institutional framework within which lawyers operate. The Clinic especially focuses on the relationship between the lawyer and other professionals facing the same social problem. Building on the field experience of actual case handling as a basis for analysis, it seeks to make students more self-critical and reflective about various lawyering functions they must undertake. Students are asked to integrate legal theory with real human crises in the cases they handle. Students will develop habits of thought and standards of performance and learn how to learn from raw experience for their future professional growth. Students must enroll for the 4-credit clinic and the 3-credit seminar, taken concurrently. The Child Advocacy Law Clinic meets the New York Pro-Bono requirement. CALC is a 7 credit course, all credits are graded. The Clinic seminar fulfills the Law School's professional responsibility requirement for graduation, but does not fulfill the New York State Bar ethics requirement.

929   Child Welfare Appellate Clinic

Students in the child welfare appellate clinic will get an opportunity to improve their writing, research and oral advocacy skills by representing parents in direct appeals to the Michigan Court of Appeals of orders terminating their parental rights. Students, working in teams of two, will handle all aspects of the appellate case including reviewing the record, researching the legal issues, preparing the brief and handling the oral argument. Students may also have an opportunity to work on drafting amicus briefs and applications to the Michigan Supreme Court. The five-credit clinic will be co-taught by clinical professors, Vivek Sankaran and Josh Kay, along with legal practice professor, Tim Pinto. There are no prerequisites for the course. The Child Welfare Appellate Clinic meets the New York Pro-Bono requirement. CWAC is a 5 credit course of which all credits are graded. The Clinic fulfills the Law School's professional responsibility requirement for graduation, but does not fulfill the New York State Bar ethics requirement. For students who matriculated in or after May 2016, the Clinic can either fulfill the Law School's professional responsibility requirement for graduation, fulfill the upper-level writing requirement, or the credits can count toward the Experiential Learning requirement -- it cannot be used to fulfill more than one of these three particular requirements.

921   Civil-Criminal Litig Clnc Sem

Civil-Criminal Litigation Clinic Seminar [aka Michigan Clinical Law Program] The classroom component of the MCLP includes some trial advocacy simulations to introduce basic trial skills. Students must enroll in the 4-credit clinic and the 3-credit seminar, taken concurrently. Each student will also participate in two intensive trial practice exercises: a mock adversarial hearing at mid-term and a mock trial at the end of the term. Other class sessions address topics including the role of the lawyer, ethical issues in law practice, client-centered lawyering, the adversarial process, other related issues affecting the clinic's poor client population, and case rounds. The seminar and field-work are graded. The MCLP meets the NY bar pro bono requirement. For a more detailed description, see: https://www.law.umich.edu/clinical/generalclinic/Pages/default.aspx The Clinic seminar fulfills the Law School's professional responsibility requirement for graduation, but does not fulfill the New York State Bar ethics requirement.

920   Civil-Criminal Litigation Clnc

Civil-Criminal Litigation Clinic [aka Michigan Clinical Law Program] The Michigan Clinical Law Program (MCLP) is a 7-credit litigation clinic that gives students the chance to practice law in a variety of issue areas affecting low-income clients. Students must enroll in the 4-credit clinic and the 3-credit seminar, taken concurrently. The clinic covers many areas of the law. The civil case-load changes term to term, but may include landlord-tenant, consumer, family law, public benefits, employment discrimination, asylum and refugee, contracts, torts, and prisoners' civil rights cases. We try to keep a wide mix of work, from simple one-issue cases to class actions raising issues of first impression. On the criminal side, students handle misdemeanor cases for their short-term files, and do (mostly post-conviction) felony cases for their more complex files. Students do all of the work for their clients (under faculty supervision), including interviewing, counseling, legal research, discovery, negotiation, motion practice, bench and jury trials, and appeals. Students have "first-chair" responsibility for their cases and primary responsibility for their clients. MCLP students handle cases in the state district, circuit, and probate courts, as well as the federal district courts, state and federal administrative agencies, and appeals to all levels of both court systems. The seminar and field-work are graded. The MCLP meets the NY bar pro bono requirement. A more detailed description can be found at: https://www.law.umich.edu/clinical/generalclinic/Pages/default.aspx The Clinic seminar fulfills the Law School's professional responsibility requirement for graduation, but does not fulfill the New York State Bar ethics requirement.

955   Comm & Econ Develop Clinic

Community and Economic Development Clinic The Community and Economic Development Clinic provides transactional legal assistance to nonprofits and community-based organizations in the City of Detroit and surrounding areas. Students engage in the supervised practice of law, assuming primary responsibility for all matters affecting your clients. Under close faculty supervision, students are responsible for all aspects of representation -- interviewing and counseling clients; planning; researching; drafting correspondence, memos, and legal documents; managing relationships with clients and others; negotiating agreements; and implementing client decisions. The Clinic works with new and established organizations. You will learn various substantive areas of law. Most students work with several clients on several matters throughout the term. The Clinic's goals are to provide first-rate legal services to sustain effective organizations and build institutions that provide needed services and opportunities in under-served urban communities and contribute to the economic development of the region while providing our students the opportunity to enhance their professional capabilities by doing actual "lawyering." Students interested in corporate, government, or public-interest practice should enroll in the course. The Clinic helps prepare students for work with organizational clients, while giving them an introduction to opportunities for transactional attorneys to serve the community, as well as government, public-interest and commercial organizations, through pro bono, board service, and volunteer work. The seminar is a time for reflections and discussion. We explore the practice of law, the Clinic's clients and issues facing the community and the region. We use simulation exercises to explore lawyering skills. Through the client work, students will identify legal issues, research them, consider different alternatives and implement client decisions. Students receive seven credits for the Clinic: three for the seminar and four for the client work. Each component is graded separately. The CEDC meets the New York Pro Bono requirement. The Clinic seminar fulfills the Law School's professional responsibility requirement for graduation, but does not fulfill the New York State Bar ethics requirement.

956   Comm & Econ Develop Clinic Sem

Community and Economic Development Clinic The Community and Economic Development Clinic provides transactional legal assistance to nonprofits and community-based organizations in the City of Detroit and surrounding areas. Students engage in the supervised practice of law, assuming primary responsibility for all matters affecting your clients. Under close faculty supervision, students are responsible for all aspects of representation -- interviewing and counseling clients; planning; researching; drafting correspondence, memos, and legal documents; managing relationships with clients and others; negotiating agreements; and implementing client decisions. The Clinic works with new and established organizations. You will learn various substantive areas of law. Most students work with several clients on several matters throughout the term. The Clinic's goals are to provide first-rate legal services to sustain effective organizations and build institutions that provide needed services and opportunities in under-served urban communities and contribute to the economic development of the region while providing our students the opportunity to enhance their professional capabilities by doing actual "lawyering." Students interested in corporate, government, or public-interest practice should enroll in the course. The Clinic helps prepare students for work with organizational clients, while giving them an introduction to opportunities for transactional attorneys to serve the community, as well as government, public-interest and commercial organizations, through pro bono, board service, and volunteer work. The seminar is a time for reflections and discussion. We explore the practice of law, the Clinic's clients and issues facing the community and the region. We use simulation exercises to explore lawyering skills. Through the client work, students will identify legal issues, research them, consider different alternatives and implement client decisions. Students receive seven credits for the Clinic: three for the seminar and four for the client work. Each component is graded separately. The CEDC meets the New York Pro Bono requirement. The Clinic seminar fulfills the Law School's professional responsibility requirement for graduation, but does not fulfill the New York State Bar ethics requirement.

927   Crim Appellate Practice

This is a clinical course in which each student is assigned to help represent an indigent defendant in the appeal of his or her felony conviction, under the supervision of attorneys from Michigan's State Appellate Defender Office. The focus of the course is on the completion of an effecitvely written appellate brief on behalf of the client, to be filed in state or federal court. The goal of the course is to develop the student's understanding and skill in all phases of appellate advocacy. The student will review the trial transcripts and lower court records, interview the client in prison (with the instructor), develop a strategy for appeal, conduct legal research, and help draft the client's brief on appeal. Feedback is provided by frequent individual meetings with the instructors, as well as oral argument before a panel of attorneys experienced in criminal law. The course gives the student the opportunity to work on a real case with real consequences for the client. While most directly relevant to those interested in criminal law, its lessons in appellate advocacy should be of general interest. Class size is limited to 12 students to assure individual attention to each student. The Clinic is a 4 credit course and meets the New York Pro-Bono requirement. Students must enroll in the 3 credit clinic and the 1 credit field component, taken concurrently. The 3 credit clinic and 1 credit field component are mandatory graded and ineligible for letter grade conversion to pass ("P") election. The Clinic fulfills the Law School's professional responsibility requirement for graduation, but does not fulfill the New York State Bar ethics requirement. For students who matriculated in or after May 2016, the Clinic can either fulfill the Law School's professional responsibility requirement for graduation, fulfill the upper-level writing requirement, or the credits can count toward the Experiential Learning requirement -- it cannot be used to fulfill more than one of these three particular requirements.

928   Criminal Appel Pract Field

This is a clinical course in which each student is assigned to help represent an indigent defendant in the appeal of his or her felony conviction, under the supervision of attorneys from Michigan's State Appellate Defender Office. The focus of the course is on the completion of an effecitvely written appellate brief on behalf of the client, to be filed in state or federal court. The goal of the course is to develop the student's understanding and skill in all phases of appellate advocacy. The student will review the trial transcripts and lower court records, interview the client in prison (with the instructor), develop a strategy for appeal, conduct legal research, and help draft the client's brief on appeal. Feedback is provided by frequent individual meetings with the instructors, as well as oral argument before a panel of attorneys experienced in criminal law. The course gives the student the opportunity to work on a real case with real consequences for the client. While most directly relevant to those interested in criminal law, its lessons in appellate advocacy should be of general interest. Class size is limited to 12 students to assure individual attention to each student. The Clinic is a 4 credit course and meets the New York Pro-Bono requirement. Students must enroll in the 3 credit clinic and the 1 credit field component, taken concurrently. The 3 credit clinic and 1 credit field component are mandatory graded and ineligible for letter grade conversion to pass ("P") election. The Clinic fulfills the Law School's professional responsibility requirement for graduation, but does not fulfill the New York State Bar ethics requirement. For students who matriculated in or after May 2016, the Clinic can either fulfill the Law School's professional responsibility requirement for graduation, fulfill the upper-level writing requirement, or the credits can count toward the Experiential Learning requirement -- it cannot be used to fulfill more than one of these three particular requirements.

993   Entrepreneurship Clinic

The Entrepreneurship Clinic, launched in winter 2012, is the first clinical law program focusing exclusively on providing legal assistance to student entrepreneurs. The Clinic will give law students the opportunity to provide greatly needed legal advice and services to student start-up businesses throughout the University of Michigan, training both the student lawyer and student businessperson to work together in addressing the legal issues in an entrepreneurial business. Under the close supervision of clinical faculty, law students in the Clinic will have primary responsibility for providing legal services to their clients. Students will provide transactional legal services to student entrepreneurs in a number of areas including entity formation, contract issues, capital structure and intellectual property including trademark, trade secret, copyright and patent. Students will have the opportunity to interview and counsel clients, strategically plan cases, draft contracts, legal memoranda, correspondence and other documents, negotiate agreements and manage client relationships. In the Clinic seminar, students will explore how to effectively represent entrepreneurs, ethical issues, lawyering skills and different substantive areas of law. The Clinic is a seven credit course. Students must enroll in the 4 credit clinic and the 3 credit seminar, taken concurrently. All 7 credits are mandatory graded and ineligible for letter grade conversion to pass ("P") election. The Clinic seminar fulfills the Law School's professional responsibility requirement for graduation, but does not fulfill the New York State Bar ethics requirement.

994   Entrepreneurship Clinic Sem

Entrepreneurship Clinic Seminar The Entrepreneurship Clinic, launched in winter 2012, is the first clinical law program focusing exclusively on providing legal assistance to student entrepreneurs. The Clinic will give law students the opportunity to provide greatly needed legal advice and services to student start-up businesses throughout the University of Michigan, training both the student lawyer and student businessperson to work together in addressing the legal issues in an entrepreneurial business. Under the close supervision of clinical faculty, law students in the Clinic will have primary responsibility for providing legal services to their clients. Students will provide transactional legal services to student entrepreneurs in a number of areas including entity formation, contract issues, capital structure and intellectual property including trademark, trade secret, copyright and patent. Students will have the opportunity to interview and counsel clients, strategically plan cases, draft contracts, legal memoranda, correspondence and other documents, negotiate agreements and manage client relationships. In the Clinic seminar, students will explore how to effectively represent entrepreneurs, ethical issues, lawyering skills and different substantive areas of law. The Clinic is a seven credit course. Students must enroll in the 4 credit clinic and the 3 credit seminar, taken concurrently. All 7 credits are mandatory graded and ineligible for letter grade conversion to pass ("P") election. The Clinic seminar fulfills the Law School's professional responsibility requirement for graduation, but does not fulfill the New York State Bar ethics requirement.

930   Environmental Law Clinic

The Clinic offers students the opportunity to learn to be effective advocates while representing the National Wildlife Federation. NWF pursues its mission to conserve wildlife in administrative, judicial, and legislative forums, and through a wide range of educational programs and publications. The course has both a clinical and a classroom component. Clinical work will teach students the mechanics of litigation, primarily in state or federal appellate venues, as well as pertinent environmental laws and administrative law. Students will also practice investigative, research, and writing skills. Class work will introduce students to principles and techniques relevant to the clinical work, and may include such subjects as drafting pleadings and motions; oral argument; and negotiation. The Clinic is a graded seven-credit-hour offering. Credits count toward New York's pro bono requirement. Courses in administrative and environmental law are not prerequisites, but would be helpful. For further information, please contact Professor Nancy Wang, Clinic Director, at 734-764-5673 or nancymw@umich.edu. The Clinic fulfills the Law School's professional responsibility requirement for graduation, but does not fulfill the New York State Bar ethics requirement.

972   Federal Appel Litig Clnc I

Federal Appellate Litigation Clinic I In the Federal Appellate Litigation Clinic, second- and third-year law students will gain hands-on experience in various stages of federal appellate litigation. Under the supervision of their clinic instructors, students will prepare and file briefs on behalf of criminal defendants and/or habeas petitioners in the United States Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit. Each student will manage an appeal from its inception, and will gain hands-on experience by reviewing the district court record and identifying issues for appeal, developing a theory of the case, researching substantive law, and preparing the client's merits brief. When appropriate in view of timing and subject matter considerations, students will have an opportunity to write reply briefs and conduct oral arguments in Cincinnati before a panel of judges on the Sixth Circuit Court of Appeals. Weekly class meetings will include case discussions and instruction on how to litigate effectively a federal criminal appeal. Students will meet frequently with instructors who will provide individualized feedback as students prepare their appellate briefs and oral arguments. In addition to developing their written and oral advocacy skills, students can expect to gain an understanding of the practical aspects of federal appellate litigation. While the clinic will be relevant to all students of law, it will be particularly valuable to students who plan to pursue federal clerkships or who have an interest in criminal or appellate litigation. The Federal Appellate Litigation Clinic meets the New York Pro-Bono requirement. FALC is a 5 credit course of which all credits are graded. The Clinic fulfills the Law School's professional responsibility requirement for graduation, but does not fulfill the New York State Bar ethics requirement. For students who matriculated in or after May 2016, the Clinic can either fulfill the Law School's professional responsibility requirement for graduation, fulfill the upper-level writing requirement, or the credits can count toward the Experiential Learning requirement -- it cannot be used to fulfill more than one of these three particular requirements.

973   Federal Appel Litig Clnc II

Federal Appellate Litigation Clinic II Students who have taken Federal Appellate Litigation Clinic I are eligible to enroll in Federal Appellate Litigation Clinic II by invitation of the professors.

951   Human Trafficking Clinic

The Human Trafficking Clinic (HTC), launched in 2009, is the first clinical law program solely dedicated to the issue of human trafficking. Also known as modern-day slavery, human trafficking is the recruitment, transportation, harboring, or receipt of people for the purposes of slavery, forced labor, and servitude. The HTC offers students the opportunity to work on both domestic and international human trafficking issues and cases. The HTC provides a range of services, including direct representation of both domestic trafficking victims and foreign nationals trafficked into the United States, advocacy for trafficking victims, and community education and training. The HTC also provides students with the opportunity to learn, practice, and improve essential advocacy skills. Students working in the HTC obtain real-world experience by working on behalf of victims of human trafficking. They also collaborate with a variety of stakeholders, including survivors of human trafficking, law enforcement, government officials, and nongovernmental organizations, to identify solutions to combat human trafficking. Students are responsible, under supervision, for all of the cases and projects within the HTC. The HTC is a 7 credit course and meets the New York Pro-Bono requirement. Students must enroll in the 4 credit clinic and the 3 credit seminar, taken concurrently. The 4 credit clinic and 3 credit seminar are mandatory graded and ineligible for letter grade conversion to pass ("P") election. The Clinic seminar fulfills the Law School's professional responsibility requirement for graduation, but does not fulfill the New York State Bar ethics requirement. The Clinic fulfills the International or Comparative Law Distribution Requirement for graduation.

954   Human Trafficking Clinic Sem

The Human Trafficking Clinic (HTC), launched in 2009, is the first clinical law program solely dedicated to the issue of human trafficking. Also known as modern-day slavery, human trafficking is the recruitment, transportation, harboring, or receipt of people for the purposes of slavery, forced labor, and servitude. The HTC offers students the opportunity to work on both domestic and international human trafficking issues and cases. The HTC provides a range of services, including direct representation of both domestic trafficking victims and foreign nationals trafficked into the United States, advocacy for trafficking victims, and community education and training. The HTC also provides students with the opportunity to learn, practice, and improve essential advocacy skills. Students working in the HTC obtain real-world experience by working on behalf of victims of human trafficking. They also collaborate with a variety of stakeholders, including survivors of human trafficking, law enforcement, government officials, and nongovernmental organizations, to identify solutions to combat human trafficking. Students are responsible, under supervision, for all of the cases and projects within the HTC. The HTC is a 7 credit course and meets the New York Pro-Bono requirement. Students must enroll in the 4 credit clinic and the 3 credit seminar, taken concurrently. The 4 credit clinic and 3 credit seminar are mandatory graded and ineligible for letter grade conversion to pass ("P"). The Clinic seminar fulfills the Law School's professional responsibility requirement for graduation, but does not fulfill the New York State Bar ethics requirement. The Clinic fulfills the International or Comparative Law Distribution Requirement for graduation.

906   Int'l Transactions Clinic

International Transactions Clinic The International Transactions Clinic (ITC) does good by doing deals. The ITC concentrates on teaching students skills that are critically important to their professional development as they enter into practice areas that involve international transactions. The transactional work of the ITC is focused on negotiating and documenting cross-border deals, particularly in emerging markets. This includes developing drafting and negotiation skills as applied to cross-border transactions, exposure to ethical issues that arise in the international commercial context, structuring and documenting investments in enterprises that primarily work in emerging markets, and an understanding of international economic and financial policy. The ITC is a full-year clinic with four credits in the Fall semester and either four or six credits in the Winter semester, at the student's option. Both terms are letter graded. Students are strongly encouraged to participate in the ITC for at least two semesters so as to allow them to provide legal support in the negotiation and documentation of multiple international transactions. To the greatest extent possible, students will have significant client exposure in the course of working on transactions, although in some cases due to the international context of these transactions such client exposure may be "virtual" making use of email, skype, and other means of electronic communication. The ITC also makes use of practicing attorneys to help supervise the work of its student clinicians. These practicing attorneys also may be physically remote from the students. The ITC clientele is very diverse. It ranges from not-for-profit organizations to for-profit organizations, from start-ups to well-established businesses, and from social enterprises to impact investors. What all of the ITC clients hold in common, however, is an international focus and a passion to change the world for the better. This diversity also means, however, that not every project of the ITC will meet the New York bar pro bono requirement. Students wanting to satisfy that requirement through their participation in the ITC should make that preference known to the ITC Director before first client assignments are made in the fall. The Clinic fulfills the Law School's professional responsibility requirement for graduation, but does not fulfill the New York State Bar ethics requirement. The Clinic can either fulfill the Law School's professional responsibility requirement for graduation or the credits can count toward the Experiential Learning requirement, but not both. The Clinic fulfills the International or Comparative Law Distribution Requirement for graduation.

933   Low-Income Taxpayer Clinic

Students in the Low-Income Taxpayer Clinic (LITC) represent individuals with federal and state tax controversies through administrative advocacy and litigation in the United States Tax Court. Students can expect to gain exposure to a broad range of tax problems, both substantive and procedural, that will be valuable when working with clients of any income level in the future. Students also work with community organizations to provide information about tax issues and taxpayer rights and responsibilities to individuals who speak English as a second language. The LITC is a 5 credit course and meets the New York Pro-Bono requirement. Students must enroll in the 2 credit clinic and the 3 credit field component, taken concurrently. The 2 credit clinic and 3 credit field component are mandatory graded and ineligible for letter grade conversion to pass ("P") election. The Clinic fulfills the Law School's professional responsibility requirement for graduation, but does not fulfill the New York State Bar ethics requirement. The Clinic can either fulfill the Law School's professional responsibility requirement for graduation or the credits can count toward the Experiential Learning requirement, but not both. The Clinic fulfills the Statutory or Regulatory Course Distribution Requirement for graduation applicable to JD students who matriculated in May 2016 and thereafter.

934   Low-Income Taxpayer Clnc Field

Students in the Low-Income Taxpayer Clinic (LITC) represent individuals with federal and state tax controversies through administrative advocacy and litigation in the United States Tax Court. Students can expect to gain exposure to a broad range of tax problems, both substantive and procedural, that will be valuable when working with clients of any income level in the future. Students also work with community organizations to provide information about tax issues and taxpayer rights and responsibilities to individuals who speak English as a second language. The LITC is a 5 credit course and meets the New York Pro-Bono requirement. Students must enroll in the 2 credit clinic and the 3 credit field component, taken concurrently. The 2 credit clinic and 3 credit field component are mandatory graded and ineligible for letter grade conversion to pass ("P") election. The Clinic fulfills the Law School's professional responsibility requirement for graduation, but does not fulfill the New York State Bar ethics requirement. The Clinic can either fulfill the Law School's professional responsibility requirement for graduation or the credits can count toward the Experiential Learning requirement, but not both. The Clinic fulfills the Statutory or Regulatory Course Distribution Requirement for graduation applicable to JD students who matriculated in May 2016 and thereafter.

976   Michigan Innocence Clinic

Founded in 2009, the Michigan Innocence Clinic was the first innocence clinic in the country to focus exclusively on non-DNA cases. In the Clinic's four-year history, it has exonerated seven individuals who had been wrongfully convicted of crimes they did not commit. Students registered in the Clinic investigate and litigate cases on behalf of inmates who are actually innocent of the crimes for which they have been convicted. Students work on all aspects of the cases, including researching claims and the law pertaining to them, investigating new evidence, writing and editing court briefs and motions, and participating in courtroom activities when there are hearings scheduled in their cases. This is a full-year clinic with seven credits per semester and meets the New York Pro-Bono requirement. All credits are mandatory graded and ineligible for letter grade conversion to pass ("P") election. The Clinic features both the clinical component described above and a seminar component, where students explore in class the legal and policy issues underlying wrongful convictions. There are no exams or papers, and students are graded on their preparedness and contribution to class, the progress they make in their cases, and the quality of the work product they produce in their cases. The Innocence Clinic's docket is diverse and relatively novel. No two cases are the same, and non-DNA innocence litigation continues to be a fascinating challenge within the field of criminal litigation. Students work with supervising attorneys to craft legal strategies and explore evidentiary avenues that would have been unimaginable even for experienced criminal litigators just a few years ago. Students interested in criminal law/procedure, appellate practice, brief writing, public interest work, innocence litigation or courtroom advocacy would be especially suitable for the Innocence Clinic. That said, there are no specific prerequisites (outside of the regular first-year courses), and no prior specialized knowledge of criminal defense or innocence litigation is required or expected. The Clinic seminar fulfills the Law School's professional responsibility requirement for graduation, but does not fulfill the New York State Bar ethics requirement. Those with further questions should email innocenceclinicapplications@umich.edu.

977   Michigan Innocence Clinic Sem

Founded in 2009, the Michigan Innocence Clinic was the first innocence clinic in the country to focus exclusively on non-DNA cases. In the Clinic's four-year history, it has exonerated seven individuals who had been wrongfully convicted of crimes they did not commit. Students registered in the Clinic investigate and litigate cases on behalf of inmates who are actually innocent of the crimes for which they have been convicted. Students work on all aspects of the cases, including researching claims and the law pertaining to them, investigating new evidence, writing and editing court briefs and motions, and participating in courtroom activities when there are hearings scheduled in their cases. This is a full-year clinic with seven credits per semester and meets the New York Pro-Bono requirement. All credits are mandatory graded and ineligible for letter grade conversion to pass ("P") election. The Clinic features both the clinical component described above and a seminar component, where students explore in class the legal and policy issues underlying wrongful convictions. There are no exams or papers, and students are graded on their preparedness and contribution to class, the progress they make in their cases, and the quality of the work product they produce in their cases. The Innocence Clinic's docket is diverse and relatively novel. No two cases are the same, and non-DNA innocence litigation continues to be a fascinating challenge within the field of criminal litigation. Students work with supervising attorneys to craft legal strategies and explore evidentiary avenues that would have been unimaginable even for experienced criminal litigators just a few years ago. Students interested in criminal law/procedure, appellate practice, brief writing, public interest work, innocence litigation or courtroom advocacy would be especially suitable for the Innocence Clinic. That said, there are no specific prerequisites (outside of the regular first-year courses), and no prior specialized knowledge of criminal defense or innocence litigation is required or expected. The Clinic seminar fulfills the Law School's professional responsibility requirement for graduation, but does not fulfill the New York State Bar ethics requirement. Those with further questions should email innocenceclinicapplications@umich.edu.

958   Pediatric Advoc Clinic

Pediatric Advocacy Clinic The Pediatric Advocacy Clinic (PAC) was one of the first medical-legal partnerships to be based in a law school clinical setting. Through this partnership, students are able to reach families most in need of legal assistance, including immigrant and Limited English Proficient (primarily Spanish-speaking) families, and become part of a team working to improve child health. Casework includes domestic violence and family law, special education, public benefits, and low-income housing. Students in the clinic are involved in all aspects of a case and learn a range of advocacy skills, from preventive legal advocacy (focusing on identifying issues at an early stage and on developing creative, multidisciplinary approaches to addressing them) to traditional litigation skills in both administrative and trial court settings. The PAC is 7 credits (4 for the seminar and 3 for the clinic) and all credits are graded. The PAC meets the New York Pro Bono requirement. The Clinic seminar fulfills the Law School's professional responsibility requirement for graduation, but does not fulfill the New York State Bar ethics requirement. For more information please contact Debra Chopp (dchopp@umich.edu).

959   Pediatric Advoc Clinic Sem

Pediatric Advocacy Clinic Seminar The Pediatric Advocacy Clinic (PAC) was one of the first medical-legal partnerships to be based in a law school clinical setting. Through this partnership, students are able to reach families most in need of legal assistance, including immigrant and Limited English Proficient (primarily Spanish-speaking) families, and become part of a team working to improve child health. Casework includes domestic violence and family law, special education, public benefits, and low-income housing. Students in the clinic are involved in all aspects of a case and learn a range of advocacy skills, from preventive legal advocacy (focusing on identifying issues at an early stage and on developing creative, multidisciplinary approaches to addressing them) to traditional litigation skills in both administrative and trial court settings. The PAC is 7 credits (4 for the seminar and 3 for the clinic) and all credits are graded. The PAC meets the New York Pro Bono requirement. The Clinic seminar fulfills the Law School's professional responsibility requirement for graduation, but does not fulfill the New York State Bar ethics requirement. For more information please contact Debra Chopp (dchopp@umich.edu).

966   Transactional Lab & Clinic

The Transactional Lab & Clinic (TLC) provides students with an opportunity to learn contract drafting, analysis, and negotiation through live-client experience and an immersive drafting-and-feedback process. Students in TLC work for large, complex organizations based around the world, as well as small, local organizations based around the Law School; this diversity provides students with an opportunity to learn how businesspeople and lawyers, occupying a variety of positions in the global and local economy, think about and do deals. TLC includes a classroom component that involves readings, discussions, and simulations regarding the skills and knowledge that contribute to successful practice as a transactional attorney (e.g., client counseling, client development, communication, contract analysis and drafting, and project management). Outside of the classroom, students will spend a substantial amount of time working in small teams on projects, which typically include, among other matters: (1) designing and developing tools (e.g., annotated contract templates) to be used across an organization for future deals and (2) negotiating, drafting, and analyzing contracts (and other transactional documents) for present deals or other live matters. Students will work under faculty supervision, meet with faculty on a weekly basis, and interact directly and regularly with clients in connection with project work. TLC is made available for 7 credits, all of which are graded. Whether time spent working on TLC matters meets the New York Pro-Bono requirement depends on the client for which the student works. TLC fulfills the Law School's professional responsibility requirement for graduation, but does not fulfill the New York State Bar ethics requirement.

974   Unemployment Insurance Clnc I

Unemployment Insurance Clinic I The Unemployment Insurance Clinic I offers a unique opportunity for second semester, first year students to quickly develop key lawyering competencies. Under faculty supervision, UIC I students represent recently unemployed workers in their claims for state unemployment insurance benefits. In this role they will have significant opportunities to interview and counsel clients, conduct fact investigations, write and file briefs and conduct administrative trials. Each student team will have multiple cases throughout the term depending on case complexity and procedural status. It is the Clinic's goal that each student will participate in at least one live administrative trial during the semester. These proceedings allow students to perform direct and cross examination, make objections, and deliver closing statements, all in front of an administrative law judge. Because worker claims for UI are typically contested by the former employer through counsel, hearings provide a relatively low-key, classic adversarial environment introduction to real-world lawyering. Students have weekly faculty supervision sessions in which they review and plan strategy for their assigned cases. Classroom instruction consists of four two-hour sessions, held in the early evening on two weekdays during each of the first two weeks of the term. Additional class sessions may be scheduled on an as-needed basis. The classroom component includes preparation and participation in a mock administrative hearing during the 3rd or 4th week of the term. Students earn two ungraded credits for their work.

975   Unemployment Insurance Clnc II

Unemployment Insurance Clinic II This graded, four credit course allows students who excelled in the Unemployment Insurance Clinic I to move beyond administrative hearings to more complex oral and written advocacy. UIC II students work on unemployment insurance appeals and impact projects and also provide peer support to first year students taking UIC I. Examples of possible impact projects include organizing and writing amicus briefs on cases with important UI policy implications, work on complex federal litigation, and work on state UI policy issues. UIC II students are assigned multiple appeals and/or impact projects each term in addition to peer support of several UIC I student teams. Students are enrolled by invitation only after having expressed interest to the UIC professor.

978   Veterans Legal Clinic

The Veterans Legal Clinic offers students the opportunity to learn holistic, client-centered lawyering through representing military veterans in a broad array of civil legal matters. In addition to issues specific to this client population, such as veterans benefits cases and discharge upgrades, students will handle matters in areas that may include family law, housing, disability, employment, consumer disputes, etc. The clinic seeks to foster in its students a strong professional identity, advocacy skills, and consistent engagement in reflective, intentional practice while providing excellent legal services to a severely underserved population. Students will take the lead in all aspects of cases, including intake, investigation, written pleadings, negotiation, and court hearings. Students will also have the opportunity to interact professionally with a wide variety of social service, medical, mental health, and other providers in the effort to meet their clients' needs. The Veterans Legal Clinic meets the New York Pro Bono requirement. Students must enroll for the 4-credit clinic and the 3-credit seminar, taken concurrently. The Veterans Legal Clinic is a 7-credit course; all credits are graded. The Clinic seminar fulfills the Law School's professional responsibility requirement for graduation, but does not fulfill the New York State Bar ethics requirement.

979   Veterans Legal Clinic Seminar

The Veterans Legal Clinic offers students the opportunity to learn holistic, client-centered lawyering through representing military veterans in a broad array of civil legal matters. In addition to issues specific to this client population, such as veterans benefits cases and discharge upgrades, students will handle matters in areas that may include family law, housing, disability, employment, consumer disputes, etc. The clinic seeks to foster in its students a strong professional identity, advocacy skills, and consistent engagement in reflective, intentional practice while providing excellent legal services to a severely underserved population. Students will take the lead in all aspects of cases, including intake, investigation, written pleadings, negotiation, and court hearings. Students will also have the opportunity to interact professionally with a wide variety of social service, medical, mental health, and other providers in the effort to meet their clients' needs. The Veterans Legal Clinic meets the New York Pro Bono requirement. Students must enroll for the 4-credit clinic and the 3-credit seminar, taken concurrently. The Veterans Legal Clinic is a 7-credit course; all credits are graded. The Clinic seminar fulfills the Law School's professional responsibility requirement for graduation, but does not fulfill the New York State Bar ethics requirement.

Seminar

808   Adv Topics in Statutory Interp

Advanced Topics in Statutory Interpretation This course addresses the variety of approaches courts and others have applied in interpreting statutory language. We will discuss the conceptual foundations of and the controversies around the dominant approaches of textualism and intentionalism. We will also consider other approaches, including dynamic and economic approaches to interpretation, and we will treat the debates over canons of construction, legislative history, and dictionaries. We will explore both theoretically-focused legal scholarship and particular cases and statutory issues. Each student will be required to write two short reaction papers over the course of the semester (each five pages or less) and, by the end of the semester, one longer paper of roughly twenty pages. The short papers will be circulated to other seminar members in advance of the relevant week's discussion. Prerequisites: None, though previous completion of Legislation and Regulation, or another statutory or regulatory course such as Administrative Law, Tax Law, Employment Law, Telecommunications Regulation, or Environmental Law, is highly recommended.

847   Civil Rights Advocacy

Civil Rights Advocacy: From Montgomery to Stonewall to the Muslim Ban The nation is currently engaged in a number of heated conversations about civil rights and social justice issues. These conversations include, but are not limited to, criminal justice reform, LGBT (particularly transgender) rights, and the ways in which we engage and/or protect religious minority communities (particularly the American Muslim community). This seminar will examine the ways in which civil rights lawyers engage in advocacy around these issues and how the lessons from previous civil rights struggles should inform current advocacy efforts. In particular, we will examine past ciivl rights "successes" (e..g, school desegregation efforts, the push for marriage equality) to determine whether they provide a blueprint -- or a cautionary tale -- for current civil rights struggles.

410   Clean Energy Law & Envt Const

Clean Energy Law and Environmental Constitutionalism In this seminar, we will be learning about and discussing the newly emerging "clean energy law" and "climate change law" as federal courts review the EPA's Clean Power Plan on appeal and clean energy development policies and financing solutions accelerate in the United States and global markets. This seminar will take place in "real time" while: (1) There is rapidly developing clean energy case law as key new decisions are being issued by the United States Supreme Court and other federal courts and by state courts in this area of emerging law; (2) The U.S. Supreme Court and the U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit are reviewing the EPA's Clean Power Plan rule; (3) The Executive Branch is advancing clean energy policies and financial incentives, such as the extension of the Production Tax Credit for wind power and Investment Tax Credit for solar energy; (4) State and municipal governments are moving to implement clean energy development policies and innovative financing approaches; (5) States are taking divergent approaches to implementing the Clean Power Plan standards; and (6) The private sector is accelerating investments in cleaner energy and cleaner transportation developments and strategies. One key opportunity and challenge for our society and government policymakers at all levels is how to construct policies that support both environmental progress -- healthier air and cleaner water, and open space with diverse habitat -- and economic growth together. This challenge is compounded by the growing realization that we must have policies that meet not just immediate needs, but future generations' needs as well by reducing carbon pollution that causes destructive climate change and by preserving natural resources both for their future use and their own intrinsic value. We will focus special attention on both the legal authorities and limitations under the Constitution and federalist system that policymakers, litigants and the public face in trying to achieve this goal. Final paper of 25-30 pages on a seminar-related topic of the student's choice. An additional 1.0 credit of Research (Law 900) is available for students writing a longer paper of 40-50 pages, which they are seeking to publish in a law journal or other similar venue. Course requirements are engaged class participation (33% of grade) and the final paper (67% of grade). There are no prerequisites for the seminar although a previous environmental law or natural resources law class, and constitutional law and administrative law course(s), will be helpful.

892   Contract Theory

Contract law is at the heart of the modern commercial world. This seminar examines the theoretical foundations of contract law. What is the relationship between contract law and morality of promising? Or economic efficiency? Or distributive justice? In addition to these broad questions, the seminary will discuss the theoretical foundations of particular doctrines, such as promissory estoppel, consideration doctrine, the Hadley rule, third-party beneficiaries, and so on.

883   Crafting a Career in the Law

Crafting a Meaningful Life and Career in the Law A significant percentage of lawyers feel deeply unsatisfied in their personal and professional lives. This course will explore why and will identify different strategies lawyers can use to make intentional decisions about life choices, both related to everyday life and longer-term decision-making. Topics will include searching for meaning in your work by identifying your core values and prototyping, learning how to engage in deep work, incorporating gratitude, movement and mindfulness in your daily living, and creating a community of supporters.

818   Faking It

What I am after is the myriad circumstances in which we are not quite sure we are sufficiently immersed in the roles we are playing. You smile politely at a person you loathe, you feign interest in whining complaints of your friends, you go through all the moves of grieving, being in love, etc, etc and are still not sure all of you is there; you feel, in other words, that you are acting, playing a role, and because that feeling intrudes, you wonder why you cannot more fully lose yourself in the moment. No, you don't feel this way all the time, but you fear the feeling when it comes, because you feel it might blow your cover. And there are times when you wonder who or what you are amidst all the various roles you are asked to play, from mourner, to lover, to barely competent lawyer. Some people we feel might too fully immerse themselves in the roles they play, losing a kind of charm we feel resides in irony and certain forms of humor. From whence these kinds of anxieties? I want to discuss issues ranging variously among hypocrisy, politeness, courtship, apology, flattery, praise, self-deception, ritual observance, propriety and emotion display. In other words more issues than we can really handle adequately. Some readings: Goffman, The Presentation of Self in Everyday Life, Relations in Public; 12th Night, Hamlet, Notes from the Underground; Smith, Theory of Moral Sentiments; Diderot, Paradox of Acting, perhaps some of the literature on passing.

888   Global Animal Law

Various international law instruments address the protection of endangered species, habitat protection, and biological diversity. Besides, numerous international legal regimes incidentally affect animals. In the seminar, we will study the animal-relevant rules and practice with a view to identifying cross-cutting principles and mechanisms. It covers, inter alia, WTO law, CITES, international environmental law, international development law, the law of indigenous peoples, international humanitarian law, and international labour law. We will examine the standard-setting practice by relevant international bodies such as FAO, the Organisation internationale des epizooties, the Codex Alimentarius Commission, the European Food Security Agency, the UN General Assembly, the UN Security Council (with regard to wildlife poaching as a threat to the peace), and the GEF. We shall also investigate whether international legal institutions such as human rights, sustainable development, the no harm-principle, extraterritorial jurisdiction, and ordre public can be used for furthering animal issues. Questions of rights, citizenship, sovereignty, multi-culturalism, neo-colonialism and North-South relations, will also come into play. Finally, regulatory approaches to animal welfare such as multi-stakeholder initiatives, labelling and certification requirements, and framework conventions, are studied.

464   Human Dignity

The Universal Declaration on Human Rights was pivotal in popularizing the use of "human dignity" in human rights discourse; human rights are increasingly seen as based on the concept of "human dignity." But what does the concept of "human dignity" mean? In the legal context, it has become increasingly clear that "human dignity" is a vital yet increasingly contested term. Apparently rival conceptions of the human person and the common good of society are emerging from this concept. This seminar will study the use of "human dignity" in modern constitutional and human rights law, in the U.S. and elsewhere, and consider its historical and philosophical background. We shall consider whether "human dignity" possesses a basic minimum core, and whether it provides a universalistic, principled basis for judicial decision-making in the human rights context, or whether the meaning of dignity is context specific, varying significantly from jurisdiction to jurisdiction and over time within particular jurisdictions. Potential students may prepare for this class by reviewing Professor McCrudden's article "Human Dignity in Human Rights Interpretation," 19 EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF INTERNATIONAL LAW 655 (2008), available at SSRN: http://ssrn.com/abstract=1162024.

857   Income Tax Treaties

This seminar will compare the OECD, UN and US model income tax treaties from both a policy and practice perspective, and discuss current challenges to the international tax regime and whether the bilateral tax treaty network can meet these challenges. Students will be expected to actively participate and present their work comparing the three models.

827   Intellectual Property Workshop

The Intellectual Property Workshop will feature presentations from scholars conducting research on intellectual property law and policy. Students will prepare for these sessions by reading the papers to be presented and writing short critiques. The Workshop will also be open to faculty from the Law School and other University departments.

Although there are no prerequisites, priority will be given to students who have previously taken one or more courses in the field of intellectual property.

811   International Project Finance

This seminar provides an introduction to the basic concepts of project finance, the legal problems that typically arise at various stages of an international project financing and the techniques that are used to resolve these problems. Topics considered may include: risk identification and mitigation; structure of the project entity and relations among the shareholders or partners; concessions for BOT and similar transactions; arranging and documenting financing from commercial banks, the capital markets and public international lending institutions; inter-creditor issues; security over project assets; design and negotiation of key project documents; environmental and human rights issues; dispute resolution arrangements; and project workouts and restructuring. Some knowledge of cross-border investment or financial transactions would be useful but is not essential.

831   Int'l Commercial Transactions

This seminar will examine selected topics of international commercial transactions. The seminar will begin with a discussion of the international commercial environment and proceed with a discussion relating to how businesses operate in that environment. Choosing the correct business vehicle for establishment of overseas business operations will be discussed, including such alternatives as establishing a branch vs. a subsidiary or utilizing a distribution network or technology transfer or joint venture. The seminar will cover U.S. export regulations and special legislation such as economic sanctions and the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act. Finally, the seminar will consider some of the issues involved in doing business in particular regions such as the Middle East, ASEAN and European Union and how to approach disputes in the international business arena. Students will be expected to present research on these issues and the topics of their papers.

835   Law & Econ Development: India

Law & Economic Development: India This seminar examines the relationship between law and economic development by focusing on one of the largest and fastest growing economies: India. The seminar begins with a brief and general discussion of the role of the law in economic development and canvasses some influential and important theories. We then provide a thumbnail sketch of India and the Indian legal system. We explore the structure of the Indian Constitution - the world's largest written Constitution - and how the Indian judiciary manages to balance two competing and often opposing images: being one of the most active and independent judiciaries while also being slow, overburdened and occasionally corrupt. Following this the seminar examines specific areas of law and legal reforms in the India that have a significant impact on economic development. These include reforms to intellectual property, labor law, corporate law and financial markets laws, property, infrastructure policy, foreign investment, competition policy, and the role of the public sector. The seminar delves into how these reforms influence economic development and what implications they have for the sectors and regions of the Indian economy. From here the seminar briefly examines some of the experiences in other countries to tease out whether the "emerging" world presents interesting insights into the theories on law and economic development. We then conclude with a discussion of how the experiences in India help to enrich our understanding of the role of law in economic development. The readings for the sessions will span across theoretical, historical, empirical and "black letter" law. This seminar will involve students from both the University of Michigan Law School as well as law students from India. The course will involve live videoconferencing every session. Students are required to write five (5) memos during the semester examining the readings for 5 different sessions or, in lieu of that and with the prior approval of Professor Khanna, to write a paper examining in depth a topic of relevance to this seminar. Regardless of which option (memos or paper) is chosen, excellent class participation will count towards the final grade.

435   Law Firm Careers/Evolv Prof

Law Firm Careers in an Evolving Profession This seminar will expose and sensitize students to the myriad real-world considerations that will affect their legal careers in the private practice of law. It will focus on current developments within the legal profession, various law practice management issues, and will explore whether the profession is undergoing transformational change as law firms increasingly adopt business models. During the first two weeks of class students will articulate what they hope to learn about the legal profession and for the remainder of the semester, work closely with their instructor to ensure that learning. Students will read "The Curmudgeon's Guide to Practicing Law" and course materials posted on Canvas. Leaders within the legal profession will appear as guest lecturers. Grades will be primarily based upon a research paper.

851   Legal History Workshop

The Legal History Workshop features presentations by leading scholars from around the country who work in this interdisciplinary field. It will be attended by faculty from the Law School as well as a number of other University departments. Presentations will situate legal developments in social, political, intellectual, and cultural context, exploring a range of substantive and methodological questions arising in the course of legal-historical work. The papers will address historical questions at the intersection of law and society, especially the relationship of law and modernity. Students receiving academic credit for the workshop are not required to have a background in history--just a strong interest in learning about legal history and in taking part in the kind of enterprise this seminar represents; they will be full participants in the sessions and will be expected to prepare short critiques of the presented scholarly papers.

478   Policing and Public Safety

This seminar will examine what constitutes public safety and what are the most effective ways to achieve it. We will look at the vast responsibility and discretion afforded police in responding to and addressing crime and the fear crime. We will discuss issues such as police legitimacy, police integrity, the use of force, and other related issues. We will also look at the role of the community and other stakeholders in achieving public safety. We will use legal scholarship, social science research, case law, news clippings and legislative responses to examine this complex area.

834   Problems in Const'l Theory

Problems in Constitutional Theory This seminar will explore the nature of constitutionality in the American legal system. What is the difference between a constitutional proposition and a non-constitutional proposition? On a certain lay understanding, a constitutional proposition would be (1) grounded in the written Constitution, (2) fundamental to the legal system, (3) entrenched against change except through Article V amendment, and (4) enforceable by the courts. But in fact, many constitutional propositions lack one or more of these characteristics, and none of these characteristics describes all propositions that properly socialized American lawyers call "constitutional." This seminar will investigate this puzzle, aiming to discern the scope and content of what we might call the "operative constitution." Key issues include the role of the written Constitution, the nature of entrenchment, and the possibility of implications for constitutional decisionmaking. Each student in the seminar will be required to write two short papers and one longer paper. The short papers, which shall not exceed five pages, will address the reading in particular weeks and will be circulated to all members of the seminar in advance of the relevant week's discussion. The longer paper, which shall not exceed 20 pages, will be due at the end of the semester. The longer paper must be original work, meaning that it must either contain an original argument or else support a known argument in a new way. A recent syllabus for this course can be found here: https://umich.box.com/s/u5eqewkbg5qfvro28jpt6hupwmfwc1ok

875   Sel Topics on 4th Amend Law

Selected Topics on Fourth Amendment Searches and Remedies This seminar will address some topical issues in Fourth Amendment search and seizure law. One set of questions concerns the scope of Fourth Amendment rights in an era of advancing technology. For example, how well do existing doctrinal rules defining searches, reasonable expectations of privacy, and consent work in a world in which everyone has a cellphone, or in which the police have increasingly sophisticated surveillance devices? Should any of these doctrines be changed and, if so, by whom and in what direction? A second set of questions concerns the ongoing evolution of judicially-crafted Fourth Amendment remedies for illegal searches. For example, does the modern-day exclusionary rule still make sense? Are recent modifications to the scope of the rule's good-faith exception welcome, or troubling? How about the current "fruit of the poisonous tree" doctrine? And depending on class interest and available time, we can address other Fourth Amendment issues as well. You will be required to write several short papers (no longer than a few pages) concerning the weekly readings, which will be circulated to the entire class in advance. And you'll be required to write one longer paper (approximately 20 pages long), due at the end of the semester. The longer paper may either be a conventional "term paper" or may be an appellate brief addressing current Fourth Amendment litigation -- either way, you'll need advance approval for your topic.

425   Topics in Criminal Law Theory

Topics in Criminal Law Theory: Discretion and Power This seminar will examine the distribution of discretion and power in the American criminal justice system. A hallmark of our system is that decision makers at virtually every stage of a prosecution enjoy wide latitude to interpret and apply the law according to their own judgment. This latitude carries both the promise of individually-tailored justice and the threat of arbitrariness and abuse. We will read a variety of legal and theoretical materials with the goal of understanding why discretion exists, how discretion is (or is not) disciplined by law, and how discretion can and should be regulated. Specific topics will include police discretion, prosecutorial discretion, plea bargaining, jury nullification, and sentencing. Students must have a taste for difficult philosophical prose but need not have a substantial background in philosophy.

Practice Simulation

612   Alt Dispute Resolution

This course introduces students to the concepts inherent in resolving disputes while utilizing processes other than traditional litigation. The most basic of these processes is negotiation. A lawyer cannot be a successful negotiator without the development of analytical skills to aid in understanding the totality of the dispute and the underlying interests of the disputing parties. In addition, a lawyer must have an appreciation for interpersonal skills necessary to become effective in communication, trust building and persuasion in an informal setting. Mediation is a somewhat more structured process of dispute resolution in which an outside neutral in engaged by the parties to facilitate the negotiation. Mediation advocacy presents a unique set of challenges not typically confronted by the courtroom advocate. Similarly, the skills required of a mediator are distinctly different from those required of a trial judge. Arbitration, summary jury trials and mini-trials are examples of other forms of alternative dispute resolution processes which are designed to enable parties to resolve disputes more quickly and inexpensively. Using case books and related materials, Jonathan Harr's A Civil Action (Vintage paperback edition), and running simulation exercises, students will develop an understanding of these alternative dispute resolution processes, will learn to confront both strategic and ethical challenges presented in these exercises and to acquire the analytical and interpersonal skills necessary to effectively assist clients to resolve disputes without litigation. Students will learn to serve as an advocate in mediation, as a mediator and as an arbitrator of simulated disputes. In addition, we will consider issues of public policy dealing with judicial reform of dispute resolution processes.

730   Appellate Advoc:Skills & Pract

Appellate Advocacy Skills and Practice This simulation course will help you develop the written and oral advocacy skills you'll need to be an effective appellate litigator (and which are highly desirable for many other forms of legal practice as well). You'll learn how to prepare and write an appellate brief and how to prepare and deliver an oral argument in court. While at times we will discuss general principles of persuasion, the course will focus more on nitty-gritty matters such as how to organize an argument; how to write effectively using well-constructed paragraphs and clear and crisp sentences; how to prepare for and handle oral questioning; and when if ever to adroitly split an infinitive or to end a sentence with a preposition you are enamored with. Class sessions will include presentations, interactive conversations, in-class exercises, and peer (and my) review of student work. Over the course of the semester, you'll produce several drafts of a brief or portions thereof, focusing both on merits arguments and on the other components of a complete appellate brief. Occasionally you may be assigned other short writing exercises, either for class time or for homework. You will work independently on some projects and collaborate with classmates on others. You'll also present two or more oral arguments during class time. The simulation exercises will be based on a mock appellate case. For most and perhaps all assignments, I'll provide you with copies of court decisions, rules, and statutes deemed relevant to the mock case; little outside research will be required. This course will demand a good deal of your time and attention throughout the semester, which I expect will be repaid by lots of constructive feedback. Your work will be assessed on the quality of your written projects, your oral presentations, and your class participation in general.

448   Business Planning

This practice/simulation course will cover the entrepreneurial business, from its inception to its end -- by dissolution, liquidation, merger or public offering. Like Gaul, the course will be divided into three parts, which will be covered and interfaced with each other on a continuing basis -- state enterprise law, Federal income tax law and enterprise documentation. The range of subjects will include the choice of entity (partnership vs. corporation), tax implications (equity vs. debt), bringing in others (investors, key employees, independent contractors), protecting the enterprise (covenants not to compete or solicit business or customers, protection of intellectual property and confidential information), expanding the business (form and format for subsidiaries and affiliates, acquisitions and joint ventures) and mergers, consolidations and public offerings.

479   Collective Bargain&Arbitration

Collective Bargaining & Arbitration

The purpose of this class is to familiarize students with the theoretical and practical aspects of collective bargaining and arbitration. Students will be assigned negotiation projects, asked to write arbitration awards and draft other documents commonly used in collective bargaining and arbitration.

676   Contracting in Complex Transac

Contracting in Complex Transactions This practice simulation course introduces complex transactions through negotiation of critical terms in a variety of corporate, real estate and technology transactions. Students will learn: (1) the process that leads from letters of intent to closing documents; (2) methods and tactics for negotiation of critical terms; and (3) substantive and commercial issues in many terms common to a variety of transactions (such as disclosures and due diligence, representations, warranties, protection and licensing of intellectual property, confidentiality, compliance, indemnities, liability limits, dispute resolution and remedies). Written exercises and mock negotiations are supplemented with discussion of underlying legal considerations and business risks; negotiation strategies and tactics; and the roles of brokers, bankers, consultants and other intermediaries. Course work and exercises involve letters of intent, term sheets and contracts adapted from practice. Students will review, comment upon, revise and negotiate contract terms, much as they will in practice. Grades are based upon classroom participation, written exercises and a take-home, short answer final exam. The course is highly recommended for students interested in other transactional courses and sophisticated business practice.

654   Editing and Advocacy

A lot of cases are won in the editing phase, given that few first drafts are very polished or persuasive. This course will teach you how to excel at that phase. You'll learn how to tighten sentences and rearrange paragraphs. You'll learn how to spruce up dull headings and tame unwieldy quotations. And because many of the short, weekly assignments will focus on fine-tuning documents you'll need on the job market -- a writing sample, a cover letter, even your resume -- you'll also leave the course with a much stronger portfolio of material for potential employers. Most of all, though, you'll gain a set of tools and vocabulary designed to help you develop one of the most sought after traits in a lawyer: being good with words.

429   Federal Prosecution & Defense

Federal Procecution and Defense

The practice/simulation course introduces students to the major categories of federal criminal investigations -- public corruption, national security, organized crime, economic crime, drug and firearm offenses, and child exploitation -- to the law enforcement agencies that conduct these investigations, to the techniques they use (e.g. electronic surveillance, search warrants, and informants) and to the front-line constitutional issues at stake. The course then turns to the role of the prosecutor, focusing on the critical strategic decisions made by assistant United States attorneys during grand jury investigations, plea negotiations, trial, and sentencing. Caselaw and statutory materials are supplemented by guest lectures and panel discussions that include representatives from the principle federal law enforcement agencies -- FBI, ATF, DEA, ICE, and Secret Service -- as well as transcripts from recent prosecutions in the Eastern District of Michigan. Students will draft search warrants and indictments, argue from both the government and defense perspective in mock detention and sentencing hearings, negotiate plea agreements, calculate sentencing guidelines, and conduct voir dire, as well as observe first-hand ongoing federal criminal cases in Ann Arbor and Detroit.

456   Government Relations Practicum

Much is often made about the influence of lobbyists and the much derided "revolving door" between government service and private practice. And, the vast majority of law students have little sense of the viability of "government relations practice" as a career path. This course will examine the history, development, and current nature of federal government relations practice in the broader sense, and lobbying as a somewhat distinct undertaking. The course materials and exercises will examine how corporations, non-profits and government entities influence public policy and policymakers. The course readings and practicum sessions will expect the students to develop an understanding of the rules and procedures of the U.S. House and Senate, as well as federal ethics laws, including the Lobbying Disclosure Act. Complex role-playing exercises will take place throughout the course.

734   Innovation / Complex Problems

Innovation, Entrepreneurial Leadership, and Analysis of Complex Problems This course develops skills for solving hard problems and creating opportunities. It teaches skills that professionals often develop only from decades of experience. Drawing on examples from public policy, business, and technology, and with a strong emphasis on team approaches, we will explore: - Risk: ways that innovators, entrepreneurs, and seasoned problem-solvers necessarily triage and manage risk. How can legally trained professionals move beyond issue spotting and become partners in navigating difficult situations? Given that we live in a world where risk cannot be eliminated, and given that risk is essential for innovation, how should we think about risk in ways that will best serve clients and colleagues? - Teamwork: team approaches to problem solving. While lawyers are trained extensively to analyze problems by themselves, many assignments encountered in working life are necessarily multi-disciplinary and require working in teams. What are the best practices and essential skills of successful teams? How do we as professionals develop systematic, effective approaches to solving complex problems in cooperation with others? - Systematically approaching problems: how do we manage ourselves, build effective teams, and navigate organizational chaos to create solutions when conditions are challenging and the stakes are high? - Innovating and creating: how do we foster creativity and innovation? How do we best prepare ourselves and others to generate creative solutions? The course includes a wide variety of readings, projects, and exercises and includes a strong emphasis on experiential education. Goals include preparing students to work effectively with innovation, entrepreneurship, and problem-solving, and as leaders of strong, cross-functional teams.

729   Innovation Platform

This class will be comprised of four tracks that will allow students to explore ways to work in various innovation fields. The weekly class component will examine various legal and business principles related to innovation and support the students' field work. The students will spend significant time working on their projects in the field. Students will routinely discuss their field work in class. Track 1: ZEAL - INVEST DETROIT & MERCURY FUND VENTURE CAPITAL LAB: Students will work with the Invest Detroit and Mercury Fund venture capital firms to learn the fundamentals of the venture capital process by assisting with deal due diligence, writing investment committee memos, and working with portfolio companies. Students will gain exposure to the venture capital and startup community in Ann Arbor and Detroit and sit in on actual deal and investment committee meetings. Students will be required to attend frequent meetings off campus, and workflow will vary with deal volume. Learn more about the lab here (http://www.legalnews.com/detroit/1402506). A competitive application process for this track will be announced in March. Track 2: SOCIAL VENTURE FUND: Students will work as a law student advisor to the Ross School of Business's Social Venture Fund ("SVF") (http://www.umsocialventure.com/). Students will be required to attend the weekly SVF meeting (typically on Sunday afternoons) and actively participate in SVF. Once the fund selects potential companies in which to invest, students will join at least one due diligence team and be responsible for the legal due diligence on potential investments. For companies in which SVF votes to invest students will review the financing deal documents. This track is a year-long track, so students will be required to take this course both semesters. Track 3: Office of Tech Transfer / MTC Autonomous Vehicle Project: Students will provide legal research support to the Office of Tech Transfer or the MTC legal working group (comprised of inhouse counsel from MTC leadership circle partners (http://www.mtc.umich.edu/partners/industry)). Students will immerse themselves in the legal and regulatory issues related to tech transfer and/or autonomous and connected vehicles. Enrollment in this Track is allowed only with permission of Bryce Pilz (bpilz@umich.edu). Track 4: Startup Immersion: Students may arrange to work for a local startup and participate in this course. While some opportunities to work with startups may be announced through Professor Ohmer, students may also arrange their own startup work and propose the arrangement to Professor Ohmer. Note: Because participating students will work with proprietary information related to their field work, as a condition of participating in this program, all students will be required to sign Non-Disclosure Agreements particular to their tracks. Enrollment in this class is allowed only with permission of Professor Adrian Ohmer (aaohmer@umich.edu).

619   Int'l Cartel Enforcement

Antitrust enforcement against cartels is booming around the globe. This one-credit course, co-taught by UM Professor Dan Crane and UM alumnus and leading international cartel practitioner Paul Victor, will explore a variety of practical issues that arise in prosecution of international cartels. Topics to be explored include leniency applications, managing corporation/manager conflicts, dealing with simultaneous enforcement in multiple jurisdictions, negotiating plea bargains, and the setting of fines and criminal remedies.

495   Negot Entrepreneurial Issues

Negotiating Entrepreneurial Issues Negotiation skills are important to any transactional legal practice. Negotiating on behalf of entrepreneurial enterprises requires a thorough understanding of market terms applicable to venture capital financing and exit transactions, as well as day-to-day transactions that are common to technology-based companies. This course will focus on negotiation of these transactions, including understanding of market terms and dynamics, and techniques typically employed in dealing with the various counterparties that start-ups deal with as they evolve.

712   Negotiation

Learning to negotiate effectively involves negotiating, observing, critiquing, and consciously applying effective strategy and skill. This course introduces students to the science, the art, and the practice of negotiation through a sequenced series of simulation exercises, which students will perform inside and outside of class. Class sessions will be used, in part, for negotiations, debriefing results, and discussion. Course readings will include negotiation literature and theory that inform effective practice. Students will be evaluated based on some combination of class participation, negotiation exercises, and periodic reflection papers.

499   Private Equity

This practice/simulation course covers the legal and legal practice issues of the private equity business. It covers and applies legal issues related to the formation and operation of private equity funds, starting with the negotiations between fund sponsors and fund investors, and moving through the partnership, contractual and securities issues of fund formation. It moves on to the process of the fund investing in typical private equity investments, including LBOs, MBOs, going private transactions, and roll-ups. The corporate, contractual and securities aspects of each type of transaction are covered.

807   Public Interest Litigation

This course examines how public interest lawyers use federal civil rights litigation to address contemporary social problems. Students will be provided with a simulated case based on an actual injustice in Detroit and develop a strategy to solve the problem. They will gain experience in client interviewing, making public records requests, drafting complaints, writing and responding to motions to dismiss, oral argument, drafting discovery requests, conducting depositions and being interviewed by the media. Students will learn how to overcome the many procedural obstacles to justice posed by 42 U.S.C. section 1983 and explore the ethical issues faced by public interest lawyers when representing vulnerable clients. The course will also emphasize how litigation can be most effective in achieving change when it is a part of an "integrated advocacy" campaign that includes public education, legislation and/or community action.

725   Securities Reg Practicum

This class will be offered only to students who are enrolled in (or have previously taken) the 743 Securities Regulation class. This is a drafting class that will focus on research and writing related to five or more corporate securities law topics. Students will be given an opportunity to discuss these topics in class and then will be asked to draft certain related disclosures as if they were an in-house corporate attorney charged with this task. The disclosures and issues presented thereby will then be discussed and analyzed in class.

432   Tax Plan for Real Estate Trans

Tax Planning for Real Estate Transactions

This practice/simulation course will deal with the tax planning related to real estate transactions, including particularly the choice of entity and the acquisition, development, operation and sale or other disposition of real estate. Within this context, we will discuss a number of issues, including capitalization vs. deductibility of expenses, deferring gain on disposition through various techniques, creative financing in today's markets and the consequences of troubled real estate.

614   Tax Procedure

This seminar covers most aspects of civil tax practice, including practice before the IRS (exams, appeals and collection), US Tax Court (regular and S cases) and US District Court (claims for refund). Emphasis will be placed on the actual practice of tax law by having the students draft documents and get feedback on their work. Students will prepare six (6) written projects in lieu of a final exam. These projects will include a FOIA request, a Protest Letter to IRS Appeals, a Tax Court Petition, a Claim for Refund, an Offer in Compromise as well as a problem set involving statute of limitations questions.

753   Trial Practice

This course is designed to familiarize students with the basics of trial advocacy, and provide exposure to actual courtroom advocacy. To that end, the class is held in the Washtenaw County Courthouse, and students will receive an orientation to the mechanics of trial practice (motion practice, scheduling orders, case evaluation, alternative dispute resolution, settlement conferences, etc.) as background to the simulated trial tasks. Those trial tasks focus on the chronological development of a trial: jury selection; opening statement; direct examination; exhibits; objections; cross examination; impeachment and rehabilitation; experts and closing arguments. Individual critique will be provided each week by the instructor. At the end of the semester, each student team will participate in a jury trial, either against two of their classmates, or against Trial Practice students from another Law School. At that time they will receive individual critique from the jury and practicing attorneys, magistrates or judges who will serve as Judges in the trial. Judge Connors