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Fellowship in Race, Law & History

2016-2017 Fellows

Daniel Fryer, JD candidate, Law School
"Phantom Trials"

Jessica Garrick, Ph.D. candidate, Sociology
"Old Rights, New Movements: Collective Rights, Immigrant Workers, and the US Labor Movement"

Sauda Nabukenya, Ph.D. candidate, History

"Ethnic Balancing, Racial Bargaining, Political Exclusions and Constitutional Development in Uganda, 1950-67"

Andrew Walker, Ph.D. candidate, History
"The Flight of the Firefly: Navigating Antislavery in the Haitian Admiralty Court"

Tara Weinberg, Ph.D. candidate, History
"Land, Law and Apartheid's Legacy: The Role of Communal Property Associations in South Africa"

Apply for a 2018-2019 fellowship. Note: Application deadline is September 10, 2018.

Fellowships and Application Procedure

The Program in Race, Law & History at Michigan Law will award up to five 2018-2019 academic year fellowships to students enrolled in J.D., Ph.D. and other terminal graduate programs at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. Fellows participate in the on-going work of the Program, including workshops, conferences, and symposia. They receive financial support for independent research and conference travel. Fellows present their research findings at the Program’s annual winter term fellows’ symposium where they receive comments from senior scholars in their field.

Fellows in Race, Law & History participate in the Program events and receive a $2,500 grant for research expenses and toward travel and accommodation expenses connected with attendance at the annual meeting of the American Society of Legal History. The fellowship period runs from October through September. Applicants must be currently enrolled in a terminal graduate degree program at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor and must be in residence in Ann Arbor for the fellowship term of October through the following April.

We welcome applications from graduate students with independent research proposals within the scope of the Program in Race, Law & History. Applications must include a 500-word research proposal, a proposed budget itemizing expected expenses, a C.V. or resume, and the name and contact information for one faculty recommender. Applications will be evaluated by an ad-hoc faculty committee based upon quality of research proposal; relevance of the research proposal to program areas of the Program in Race, Law & History; support of faculty; and academic distinction. (Note, the fellowship does not cover tuition or living expenses.) Applications are due via email to RaceLawHistoryFellowships@umich.edu. Fellowship recipients will be announced on October 1.

The Michigan Law Program in Race, Law & History is an interdisciplinary program dedicated to research and teaching at the intersection of these three lines of intellectual inquiry. Through new scholarship, the training of students in law and history, and collaborations with colleagues and institutions at Michigan and beyond, the Program provides a unique historical perspective on the ongoing salience of race in our world. Our work is grounded in scholarship that has established race as at the core of interpreting the history of the Americas. Race in this sense is understood as a set of ideas that rely upon understandings of religion, culture, labor, biology, and politics, and have both rationalized profound inequality and galvanized movements for social justice. Scholars have charted the connections between legal culture and slavery and its abolition, the emergence of democratic states, imperialism, social welfare policy, and movements for civil and human rights. Our work is linked to the broad trends in social and cultural history, exploring how race and law have come together to shape ideas about home, family, marriage, gender, and sexuality. 

About the Program
The Michigan Law Program in Race, Law & History is an interdisciplinary program dedicated to research and teaching at the intersection of these three lines of intellectual inquiry. Through new scholarship, the training of students in law and history, and collaborations with colleagues and institutions at Michigan and beyond, the Program provides a unique historical perspective on the ongoing salience of race in our world. Our work is grounded in scholarship that has established race as at the core of interpreting the history of the Americas. Race in this sense is understood as a set of ideas that rely upon understandings of religion, culture, labor, biology, and politics, and have both rationalized profound inequality and galvanized movements for social justice. Scholars have charted the connections between legal culture and slavery and its abolition, the emergence of democratic states, imperialism, social welfare policy, and movements for civil and human rights. Our work is linked to the broad trends in social and cultural history, exploring how race and law have come together to shape ideas about home, family, marriage, gender, and sexuality.

The fellowships in Race, Law & History are made possible through the support of Faith (AB '69) and Stephen (AB '66, JD '69) Brown and Professor Tom and Ruth Green.

Questions should be directed to RaceLawHistoryFellowships@umich.edu. ​​​​

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